Archive for the ‘Tourism’ Category

Weekend runs 18-19 March 2017   Leave a comment

 

The Saturday and Sunday runs, this weekend, came in at just over 24 miles but with only 1 new pub to add.  Sunday was especially frustrating as the run involved long climbs and steady 25 mph winds (with gusts to 40).

 

 

 

The target for the day was the Case Is Altered on the hill north of Harrow Weald followed by a stop in Homebase to pick up some wall hanging hardware, but La Casa Alta appears to have been converted to a private residence.

 

 

 

No problem, I thought, since the Hare sits a few hundred meters away on the way to the d.i.y. place.  They, unfortunately, were closed for remodeling until next weekend.  Shit.  I consulted my maps and decided to blow past the pubs in Harrow Weald (which I will almost certainly run past again this summer) in favour of the Letchford Arms which was on the route home near my first return trip rail crossing.

 

 

 

Fucking maps.  The place, shown above in Google Streetview in 2008 (top) and 2016, is now a fully occupied block of flats.  At this point, I was quite thirsty for anything (juice, water, beer, just something rehydrating) and decided to just go to a news agent and buy whatever they had in a bottle.  How disappointing (but it was nice to get some pictures hung up on the walls, later that afternoon).

 

 

The Saturday run was a bit more satisfying.  Both days had strong winds (stupidly, I designed both runs to have the winds in my face on the return trips) but Saturday was sunny and almost warm and felt as much like a Spring day as the blooms and new growth everywhere would make you think it was.  After a brief stop in the Office, I was back on the road and scoping out the blackthorn blooms for next year’s batch of sloe gin.

Next weekend is scheduled to be a little shorter but I may bump up the mileage to make up for the deficit (distance and pints) this weekend.

 

London Outer Orbital Path (Sections 13-14)   2 comments

From the King’s Arms, you pick up the LOOP down a long hill. On a cold, rainy day like this you have to resist the strong urge to bolt into the Old Orchard for a hot coffee with brandy but my willpower was strong.

As always, there were decent sights to take in along the way. Early on, I spotted my first Thomasson in a while: gate posts in good stead nowhere near a fence or, indeed, any structure at all.

 

 

 

The descriptions of Sections 13 and 14 I had read suggested fairly well maintained paths with only a steep hill near the start before leveling out, more or less, for the rest of the trek. Liars! Oh, the initial hill was steep, mind you, but the path was slicker than goose shit, uneven, and in places boggy to knee depths. At a little over ten miles, the run left me feeling beaten and exhausted and took quite a bit longer than I allocated.

 

The French Tickler tree (nobbled for your pleasure) marked the extent of my horticultural exploration. Of course, as Dorothy Parker said, “you can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.”

 

 

 

There were two more pub stops on the route, this day, although another that opens late will get a visit sometime this year. The first was the Rose and Crown just after an uphill climb on a stretch of road with no pedestrian-friendly verge. About a mile later after a wooded journey, Ye Olde Greene Manne provided sustenance and shelter (and some bizarre companionship).

Art is where you find it and this automotive pipe on a concrete plinth in the deep wood was a treat to behold.  Breathtaking.

 

 

 

The deepest mud was too treacherous to photograph and I slogged through it with the realisation that it contained a significant amount of horse shit from the stables near the roadway by which I exited this section.

 

 

I was especially fragrant by this time so I skipped the grocery stores and other possible bar stops, opting instead to run through as many clear puddles as I could find on my way to Northwood Hills tube station.

 

London Outer Orbital Path (Section 10)   3 comments

I left the Green Man refreshed and ready to start Section 10 of the London Outer Orbital Path by looping around and entering the River Crane Causeway at the end of Section 9 (which I will return to early in May running it and several of the lower numbered Sections).  This looked promising and, except for the run back along the highway to find my way over the Piccadilly Line, it was fairly well way-marked.

 

And, damn near impassable:

 

 

There was a scenic fly tipping exhibit:

 

 

And, a chance to wave to visitors of our fair isles as I crossed under the landing path at the east end of Heathrow’s runways.

 

 

Scenes of pristine waterways were a bonus:

 

 

St Dunstan’s appears to be derelict, but the cemetery is well-maintained:

 

Toward the end of the trot (not far past the Crane pub), there were signs of springtime coming.  The council is probably counting on the vegetation to hide all this garbage:

 

 

Section 10 concludes as you pass the Nestlé factory on the canal at Hayes.  Just up ahead, there are more refreshments at the Old Crown.

 

 

 

London Outer Orbital Path (Intro and Sections 11 & 12)   Leave a comment

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A friend who doesn’t run pointed out that I’ve been repeatedly doing a section or two of the London Outer Orbital Path (LOOP).  This is how I wound up running the Ridgeway Challenge a couple of years ago after doing most of the Avebury to Wantage segments of that long distance path; I decided to approach this one sensibly and do it entirely in sections as defined by the Transport For London pamphlets about the LOOP.

I’ve already covered Section 11, near enough, in the run posting from late February (including the trip to the White House pub along the way).  Section 12 gets a lot of attention from me since it is the nearest one to the house; it was covered variously in postings about the Coy Carp, the Bear on the Barge, and the Swan and Bottle.

With plans to finish this in Spring, I’ll do a couple of more sections up till then but really focus on the final 100 miles over a couple of weekends in May.  As it stands, I have 138 out of 150 miles (22 out of 24 Sections) still to go and really need to step up my game as far as route description and photography go…Des de Moor’s blog should be considered the gold standard for this (his postings on Sections 11 & 12 are here).

Surprisingly, NOT a Fetish Bar   Leave a comment

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Since I was cutting the run short, anyway, I was pleased when I looked up from my fish treat and spotted what I reckoned to be another pub sign. Even better, this appeared to be a deviant bar so at last I might have an interesting write-up to do (no offense to the Tree, the Waterside, or the Coy Carp earlier this day).  I eagerly approached the Carpet and Vinyl with thoughts of 70’s pubic hair and form-fitting/fluids resistance outfits.

Alas, it was non-euphemistically a carpet and vinyl shop. Sort of the old bait-and-switch (and, come to think of it, “The Bait & Switch” might make a good fetish bar name, too).

 

London A to Z Runs : H   6 comments

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H is for Heathrow’s Third Runway, an expensive boondoggle that will cost more — and have less positive effect — than a similar expansion of Gatwick (although, what is really needed is to steer some of the traffic in the directions of Birmingham, Manchester, or Leeds).  In addition to infringing on the Greenbelt, this project will have the added advantage of obliterating two of the villages on today’s route and placing a third one in the flight path at the end of the new runway.  Yay!

 

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Featuring in the Five Bells, Harmondsworth

 

It isn’t a done deal but it IS what the current government has planned so let this run write-up serve as an obit for the villages of Longford and Harmondsworth and commiserations with the property values of Sipson.

 

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The road between Harmondsworth and Sipson: on the left goes the new runway .

 

Along with the displacement of people, there are several historic pubs — the King William in Sipson, the Five Bells in Harmondsworth, and in Longford the King’s Arms and the White Horse — that will either be flattened or find themselves adjacent to the fence or in the flight path a few hundred feet from the end of the new runway.

 

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But, the encroachment on London’s greenbelt, the nature preserve that rings the city, is probably the worst thing.  Hungry and in need of some ballast for the drinks, I stopped for a kebab along the dreadful hazardous waste site that is the current border with the airport.  All of this can easily be rebuilt, true enough, and will be.  More is the pity.

 

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National Libraries, Museums, & Galeries March 2016-11-05   1 comment

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We joined a variety of other supporters and activists for the National Libraries, Museums, and Galleries March Saturday.  Starting at The British Library, a few thousand of us chanted slogans and blocked traffic the 2 mile journey to Trafalgar Square.

 

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The Police Support Officers were comradely and professional.

 

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And, it was our first chance to really have a look around at some of the architecture we’ve passed, unnoticed, dozens of times before:

 

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The speeches were plagued by multiple failures of the sound systems.  My fellow socialists need a class in piss ups at breweries.

 

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Posted November 7, 2016 by Drunken Bunny in art, Politics, Tourism

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